Friday, November 14, 2008

Speaking of brakes...

There's a new poll! What kind of brakes do you use on your touring bike? There's such a large choice in brakes these days, I'm curious to see what you guys use on your fully loaded tourers. Each type seems to have their own distinct advantages that it is hard to decide.

Why did you choose (factors, advantages, etc.,) the brakes you chose? Add them in the comments.

7 comments:

RussRoca said...

For me, personally, I like the stopping power of V's but wanted to try something new on my tourer so I threw on some canti's.

I think they look a lot classier (that counts for something right?) and have great clearance for fenders and wide tires. V-brakes would be hitting the current fenders I have on now.

I do notice a slight drop in sheer braking power, but not enough to make me go back to Vs at this point.

Jared said...

I have a set of wide profile cantis on my touring bike (Tektro CR720s). They have considerably more stopping power than the V Brakes that I started with, but not as much power as discs.

I would love to have a bike with disc brakes as they have a lot of great benefits over rim brakes...however there are some downsides too like rack mounting.

2whls3spds said...

Old School rider here. My built for purpose touring bikes have always had cantilever brakes with the Salmon pads. IIRC one bike has Suntour XCM (now defunct) the other Shimano. I was using canti's long before V brakes were ever invented. They are hard to improve on.

Aaron

Tex69 said...

My problem is which bike. On the commuter/touring LHT, I have V-brakes. On some other bikes cantis and I like them both. I'm a little more proficient at adjusting my V-brakes these days, so they got my vote.

Angus said...

I use high profile cantilevers. They give a much more solid feel when using road bike levers.

Tommy Williams said...

I use cantilevers: specifically, the Big Squeeze made by R+E Cycles in Seattle.

Clearance for wide tires and wide fenders and thick pads that last a long time. And reasonable longevity for the rims if I'm diligent about keeping them clean.

My bike is a touring bike but I use it for utility cycling: commute to work all year round, trips to the grocery store, etc. I typically carry at least 20 pounds of bags, clothes, laptop, lunch, books, etc.

Wayne Myer said...

A totally religious/context-laden discussion, but my money goes with discs. Fault-tolerant, low-maintenance, superlative modulation, no rim-wear, full power in all weather, long-wearing, and almost no need to clean them.

Of course, this unfortunately severely limits my choice of bicycles, especially when steel is my first tubing choice...